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senses

senses Blog Comments
Tuesday, October 25, 2016 12:00 AM

senses

The five well-known human senses are vision, hearing, smell, taste, and touch. The absolute thresholds of each of these senses may vary somewhat from person to person; they also differ dramatically across different species. For instance, humans have better visual acuity than rats, but poorer visual acuity than hawks. And black bears can smell a peanut butter sandwich from 18 miles away, while sharks can sense one drop of blood in a million drops of water.

Assume you have the ability to genetically engineer future generations of humans in such a way that their absolute thresholds are on a par with the best abilities found in nonhumans (eyes of a hawk, sense of smell of a shark, etc.).

What advantages and disadvantages would this present for these “supersense” future humans?

Start your discussion by speculating on how humans evolved their present sensory abilities and then deal with the pros and cons of having “supersenses


Posted By Tracy Wyatt at 12:00 AM
 Comments Collapse Comments
Hailey Yoder wrote ...
In response to Skylee Bowlin, I agree with you completely. I also feel as if it will do way more harm than good, especially with people who have mental illnesses or problems with things like that. It may do good sometimes, but in the bigger picture, I believe that it will more strongly hurt people, rather than help.
11/7/2016 1:03 PM
Jordan Brown wrote ...
I would also like to make a comment to the prompt directly, even if we could heighten a sense, why? The prompt asks about what we would modify, but in life it wouldn't come down to our decision, it would come down to evolution. The question must become, what would be the sense that would evolve? Humans are clearly mainly reliant on sight. Would it become necessary for us to improve upon that sense or would it be beneficial for us to develop another sense? And maybe even generate a sense we don't have, such as echolocation. I think that if we were to be driven to develop more, echolocation makes the most sense, or maybe some form of night vision. Since we are so dependent on sight, we have been forced to cling to light. But, if we were able to see into the night, we would become a more active species and gain an advantage in a domain that we have struggled to conquer since the beginning. I just wanted to bring up the point that I think it's less of a personal preference and more of a what would happen, and by this rational I think I render my former argument mute. Because if we were forced to evolve into this sense, it wouldn't be to the detriment of the species.
11/4/2016 9:10 PM
Kaylyn Harrison wrote ...
I agree with Kiarra, the Senses we have, we have for a reason. If we were to change anything or stengthen them we wouldn't really have much of a real need to use them. I'm sure they'd be fun and kinda cool at first but eventually would become more of a distraction and a nusiance.
11/4/2016 8:46 PM
Tiffany O'Brien wrote ...
In response to Draven Stanley... I thought this was very interesting. I never thought of the senses like that. I do agree though that eye sight would be the best option in improvement.
11/4/2016 8:40 PM
Kaylyn Harrison wrote ...
I agree with jade, after weighing the pros and cons it seems that there would be more of a bother than an advantage with super senses.
11/4/2016 8:39 PM
Tiffany O'Brien wrote ...
In response to Anna Buratti... I agree with your point. If we did have anything extra then it would cause problems but also we might be used to the smell or sight if we always had it. I do agree with your point though!
11/4/2016 8:36 PM
Zeina Katabi wrote ...
So of course I have to respond to Bri's post and I agree with her whole post. She brought up the idea of the smell of someone's vomit being intensified, and that would be the worst thing that could happen to me! My biggest phobia is vomit, and I've actually had to work through my fear of it, since it does affect me so much. One great point Bri pointed out was that we would constantly be paranoid which is so true! There would be the struggle of hearing ambulances and pulling over, even though the sirens could be far away from us. Another point that just occurred to me is that pain would be greatly intensified do to our sense of touch. Although we may react faster, the pain would still be there, and it would hurt so much more.
11/4/2016 6:58 PM
zeina katabi wrote ...
I really like the points Bailey B brought up. I didn't even think about the pros that she came up with. It would help with survival in emergency situations as far as smell and touch. As for the cons of taste, I don't think they would apply to much to the average person because one just simply doesn't have to eat something they don't like. I can see where you are coming from by being able to hear people better which would be a pro, but for paying attention, I feel as though increased hearing would only hinder rather than help. Unless one could easily block others out, concentrating would be a rough task, and in some cases, it'd feel nearly impossible. As for me, I can barely focus on the teacher when someone is whispering, so if I could hear all sounds at once, my grades would go down the tubes.
11/4/2016 6:49 PM
Zeina Katabi wrote ...
I agree with Kylie that super eyesight would be a good thing, because we wouldn't need binoculars or eye glasses. While that is good for the consumer, it would be bad for the producer because the glasses and contacts industry is huge, and employs many, so many jobs would be lost.
11/4/2016 6:43 PM
Bariah Wade wrote ...
Amber Mondak: I found an article about the mantis shrimp at http://www.sci-news.com/biology/science-color-vision-mantis-shrimp-01719.html !
11/4/2016 5:16 PM
Bariah Wade wrote ...
In response to Savanna, I agree that future generations should have the ability to have an increase of smell. It would very beneficial. Yet, a disadvantage
11/4/2016 5:13 PM
Reilly Cameron wrote ...
In response to Faith Leech, although a super sense of smell would give some people headaches, imagine the benefits to having a heightened sense of smell. This super sense could help with many different jobs and fields of work.
11/4/2016 2:28 PM
Reilly Cameron wrote ...
In response to Skylar Dredge, I agree that a heightened sense of hearing and eyesight would be beneficial to the human race when in danger. For example, if the U.S. Government needed a human with heightened eyesight and hearing to help with some high risk tasks such as finding out another country's plans to bomb us and when it will happen. This would take us out of harms way by knowing when and where the bombs or nuclear material will be placed and or dropped.
11/4/2016 2:23 PM
Tracy Wyatt wrote ...

Skylar and Sarah have valid points that privacy may become an issue with heightened senses.  You may be able to detect things about people they would rather keep to themselves.  This could raise legal issue with privacy as well.  And hope you are feeling better Sarah after your surgery!

11/4/2016 12:57 PM
Sarah Foster wrote ...
Willow's response really made me think. There is so much that could be changed with super senses. Also a way of think is if humans senses evolve there is a chance we could evolve out of our super senses and into something that is better or worse.
11/4/2016 10:33 AM
Sarah Foster wrote ...
I agree with Skylar's disadvantages. Super senses would take away our privacy because you would be able to hear and see everything.
11/4/2016 10:31 AM
Steven Littell wrote ...
In response to Ryan Cuthbertson comment, I think that if we could hear any sound frequency it could become very harmful with things like dog whistles. I believe that we may have to always carry around a good pair of ear plugs.
11/4/2016 10:29 AM
Anna Buratti wrote ...
I also agree with Ryan C. A lot of people, including my brother, are very particular when it comes to things touching them. If we had super senses and could feel the little mites and dust touching you, some people would not be able to live like that.
11/4/2016 10:29 AM
Steven Littell wrote ...
In response to Tiffany O'Brien comment I think that it would be extremely irritating to have to see 360 degree's all the time and it would be vary difficult to focus. But it could be more useful when needing to defend yourself
11/4/2016 10:26 AM
Ragan Kirksey wrote ...
In response to Seth, I agree that it would be difficult to suddenly increase the sense of hearing. More than annoying, it seems as though it could be painful as well. It took humans many years to evolve, I'm not sure how quickly and well we could adjust to such a major change. But of course, I'm also not an expert.
11/4/2016 9:54 AM
Ragan Kirksey wrote ...
In response to Bariah, I agree that it would be awesome to be able to see all of the colors of the world. When you think about it, humans seem so limited on our senses. This is especially true when compared with animals that have such acute senses, like the cat’s amazing sense of balance. Just think, people will go to a circus to watch a human walk across a tightrope. This type of balance is such a treacherous talent to us humans, but something the average cat can master in a minute.
11/4/2016 9:53 AM
ALexxis Heestand wrote ...
I agree with Angela it would be nice to have supersenses in some cases, like eating your favorite food and it tasting even better. Then again not in others like when she talks about having to smell a skunk for even longer, or if we could see through things that would be very unpleasant, i know i wouldn't want to accidentally see something bad like my someone in the bathroom.
11/4/2016 8:49 AM
Alexxis Heestand wrote ...
Amber would the fact that we have supersenses really eliminate the issue of blindness and deafness? People are born with this or can get injured to causes these issues so would humans evolving to have better senses eliminate the fact some people are just born blind or deaf?
11/4/2016 8:43 AM
Deanna Pagnucco wrote ...
I agree with Anna, our senses are the way they are because we have already adapted to our surroundings. If we would intensify our senses more then we would be distracted more
11/4/2016 7:37 AM
Deanna Pagnucco wrote ...
Mya makes a good point that if our senses were to be heightened, then bad experiences would be worse because of intense senses, one of her examples was we could see something we might not want to see.
11/4/2016 7:33 AM
Carrie Barnes wrote ...
In response to Ryan C., I think it would be harder to genetically engineer everyone differently so everyone has a different sense of adaptation to sound. It would prove to be very difficult to engineer everyone separetly. The general idea of modifying everyone to their abilities was a good idea though, it would just be harder; however, probably not impossible because our technology is always improving.
11/4/2016 5:42 AM
Carrie Barnes wrote ...
In response to Jade B., I agree with that it would be an advantage to be able to see farther distances, but having a heightened sense of smell would be a disadvantage. However, I think that if we were to modify any senses, they would all have different downsides to them.
11/4/2016 5:35 AM
Markayla Frenz wrote ...
I found Carries very interesting. I never thought of how our heightened senses could affect jobs. This could cause many jobs to be losses because we would no longer need them. Just like ophthalmologist would be out of a job because nobody would need glasses, or surgery. Or a otolaryngologist, they would be out of a job because everyone would be able to hear everything and never go deaf
11/3/2016 11:33 PM
Markayla Frenz wrote ...
Ragan makes a good point about changing our hearing. I agree that having better hearing could help us with detecting predators and staying away from them. But this also comes with it's downfalls like having to deal with the day to day issues that come along with loud environments.
11/3/2016 11:25 PM
Skylee Bowlin wrote ...
I also agree with Bri's comment on Bailey's blog. I believe that we already have what we need to survive, and with technology we can improve almost all of our senses, if they are flawed!
11/3/2016 10:50 PM
Bailey Polinori wrote ...
Continuing off of what Savanna said, humans are made with the senses we have for a reason, just as animals are made with different abilities and senses than humans. Too alter this is unneeded and would cause too many problems.
11/3/2016 10:49 PM
Skylee Bowlin wrote ...
I agree with Deanna, that the increase of our sense of smell would help in the police force. They're are truly so many steps that would be taken away from proccesses if our senses were stronger. Imagine how many new medical breakthroughs there would be if there all of our senses improved!!!
11/3/2016 10:47 PM
Bailey Polinori wrote ...
I also agree with Angela and Anna. I think that there would be too many cons to having super senses and life would be much less complicated without them.
11/3/2016 10:46 PM
Kylie Coffelt wrote ...
In response to Skylar D. I completely agree with your point that our privacy would be invaded. You brought up a good point when you said that maybe things we can't see should be better off not seen. I agree that there are many things we can't see and if we did see them it might drive us insane. For example, what if these super senses made it so we could see all of the bacteria on our hands? Things like that would drive the human population absolutely insane.
11/3/2016 10:45 PM
Kaylen Sanor wrote ...
Kyleigh Todd, I never thought about how we would be able to smell all of the harmful vapors/pollution/garbage in the air if we had a super sense of smell. I think that is a very interesting point. Like what you said, I think if we were able to actually smell the air with all the pollution in it, people would be quicker in taking action to clean the air and the planet. It is a really important issue (cleaning the air/planet), and sometimes I think people do not take it seriously.
11/3/2016 7:07 PM
Kaylen Sanor wrote ...
Ms. Wyatt, I like your idea of us having a super sense of smell and possibly being able to detect illegal drugs. If we had this sense, law enforcement would not have to train dogs to detect illegal substances. This would save a lot of time and money for law enforcement, and it could possibly create some new jobs.
11/3/2016 6:56 PM
Anna Buratti wrote ...
I also agree with Reilly when she talks about people taking advantage of you if you had these senses but no one else did. People would want you to read other peoples minds, move things for them, or whatever else your brain/ body could do.
11/3/2016 5:22 PM
Anna Buratti wrote ...
I agree completely with Faith. I honestly do not think having super strong senses would do any good for us humans. She had an excellent point about people getting headaches when they smell something to strong or having something too loud by them. I personally hate loud music and get panic attacks and headaches if im around loud music or live music too long.
11/3/2016 5:20 PM
Hunter Gillingham wrote ...
Ruchi makes a good point about how there are some negative effects if we had super senses. She made a good point about people might become robotic and not being their actually self. I feel like if that happen, everyone will be the same and no one will be that much different between others.
11/3/2016 11:20 AM
Mya Wilson wrote ...
I agree with Skylar it wouldn't be as great having super senses as everyone thinks it would be. the senses we have today or working just fine for us.
11/3/2016 11:18 AM
Hunter Gillingham wrote ...
Angel makes a good point. If we had super senses, our senses would evolve over time if needed. Just like how we evolved our senses we have now.
11/3/2016 11:14 AM
Tracy Wyatt wrote ...

Bailey and Bri bring up good points.  Maybe the idea of supersenses seems better than it would be.  Maybe just having what we need is really enough!

11/3/2016 8:27 AM
Tracy Wyatt wrote ...

As a few of you mentioned super senses may impact jobs, both positively and negatively.  There may be less need for certain jobs, but could this create more jobs.  Could a super sense of smell help in detecting disease or help find illegal substances for the police?  Some of you have mentioned this already.  What other sorts of things could super senses do for us?

11/3/2016 8:24 AM
Tracy Wyatt wrote ...

Jordan brings up a good point, it would be terrible to have these heightened senses disrupt your day to day life.  What Jordan said about being able to feel your shirt on your skin reminds me of when you are sick and you feel as if you can sense every little thing that touches you and it hurts.  I can't imagine that sensation all of the time!

11/3/2016 8:20 AM
Kiarra Keller wrote ...
Humans have a lot of great senses , we have these senses so we don't have the same senses as a halk or a bear. We have these senses so our sense of smell is not to strong or our eye sight you can see from inches away. We were made a different way because we know how to survive, animals have to learn to survive by there senses but some pros on this statement is that you could smell something you lost or smell things that don't smell to good and that you should not eat it and you would see from an long distance so if there's danger from an distance you could run away from it quicker. Some cons is that the sense of smell can be can be gross because you could smell someone from miles away., and the sight might become a false alarm if you see something that you think would be a danger to you.
11/3/2016 8:07 AM
Ryan Stainer wrote ...
I agree with Steve Littel that if our senses do indeed evolve, while it would be beneficial it would also be annoying to someone depending on how their senses evolve like smelling electricity.
11/3/2016 7:26 AM
Brianna Biery wrote ...
In response in Bailey B. I agree that maybe in some ways a slight increase in our senses could come as some sort of an advantage but then as you said you have to consider some of the disadvantages. Maybe we are just better off with our flawed senses because they meet the requirements we need in order to survive.
11/2/2016 10:43 PM
Skylar Dredge wrote ...
Over time, humans have changed to adapt to our survival needs. Take eyesight and hearing for example. First, people had to go on without being able to see, then glasses were invented, after glasses, came contacts. And for hearing, first people were just unable to hear, then they were given like a horn type thing to put up against their ear to enhance their hearing, and through the years, they have come up with hearing aids that you can just stick in your ear and they are barely even noticeable. Having super senses could have advantages, like possibly helping us hear or see something that could be on its way to put us in danger, but super senses could ultimately hurt us rather than help us. I mean yeah, it would be cool to have them, you’d feel like you were some kind of superhero, but we have the senses we need to survive the world we live in. If we had these super senses, we 1) wouldn’t have much privacy if being able to hear things would be intensified. 2) Being able to see things at a more intense level could make us see at a level, and see things that maybe we shouldn’t or want to be seeing. Our senses have adapted to the way we need to survive.
11/2/2016 9:10 PM
Allison Slutz wrote ...
I really found Carrie’s point on how super-humans would affect the economy quite interesting. I did not think about how having really good senses would affect the jobs. Job loss has been a highly talked about topic in the news recently and this would lead to no longer needing certain jobs. There would not be a demand for audiologists because people would have incredible hearing and would not need hearing aids. This would also affect the workers making the parts for these products. Since the product would not be in high demand, only a few people would be needed to make the parts.
11/2/2016 8:45 PM
Allison Slutz wrote ...
Tiffany talked about how having eye sight of a bunny because of how they can see almost 360 degrees. I think this would be an exceptional sense to have, but I see potential problems. The humans could be bringing in so much information our brain could choose to ignore some of this.
11/2/2016 8:44 PM
Angela Young wrote ...
I can see what RJ means. It is possible that if these senses evolve overtime that we may not have to deal with some of the cons that could potentially come with it.
11/2/2016 8:34 PM
Angela wrote ...
I agree with anna. I think having super senses would cause a lot of issues and probably wouldn't be worth it.
11/2/2016 8:32 PM
Jordan Brown wrote ...
In response to R.J.'s general comment, I agree to some extent. I believe that we would be able to block out a lot of this new influx of sensory input just as we do now, but I also believe that it would be a larger hassle for us to grow into. Consider the maturation process now, and how long it takes for a child to fully develop and mature. I think this would be another point that having heightened senses would hit on as it would require more time, and possibly quite a bit more irritation on the part of the child, to learn to use and exercise their senses as we do now with our own. Also, would some sort of disorders spring up, as there are now, where one simply couldn't help but focus on the large influx of information. Would this cause them to shut down or would they always be caught with their attention skewed in dozens of directions? In a comment to what Ms. Wyatt said as well, even if we gain these abilities over time, I still believe that the time to become adept with them will increase, especially depending on what sense you enhance. Some might require a greater learning and desensitizing curve than others. What if you could always feel your shirt on your skin? or could always taste your own breath in detail? You have to wonder if the height in these senses would become a lingering presence in our everyday lives and every thought, or if they would merely sink into the background like our senses do now, and I think that boils down to the maturation process again and how we grow up with these heightened senses. The steps our brain, must make to use them. I imagine that if we were to heighten a sense, several parts of the brain would have to become, more active than they are now, not just the centers for that sense, but many other areas of the brain would have to expand and evolve for it to be able to encompass a heightened sense. And even then, the centers aren't extremely localized.
11/2/2016 5:18 PM
Amber Mondak wrote ...
Bariah Wade: Where did you get the information about the mantis shrimp? I would love to know more! This reminds me of how(don't mind me getting religious here) in the Bible it is mentioned that there are more colors that we cannot perceive as humans right now, but in the future we may be able to. I knew about animals having better senses than ours, but not able to see more colors. I can't wait, I mean, that would be cool!
11/2/2016 4:15 PM
Amber Mondak wrote ...
Regan Crosser: I like how you said that our senses are programmed into our brain and that even if we lost a sense, we would not notice it because of this. We wouldn't notice that we had supersenses because we would have slowly(hopefully) adapted to it, as RJ Yarwood stated. You also said that we would keep on perfecting something that doesn't need perfected. I think that is one of the downfalls of humankind, while we cannot reach full perfection, we still try and try and try. I am not saying that trying again to achieve something is wrong, just that not being satisfied until perfection happens is.
11/2/2016 3:57 PM
Tracy Wyatt wrote ...

I think RJ makes a good point.  If these supersenses evolved over time then we would adapt to them.  It may be that they would not drive us crazy at all.  If we got them quickly it would likely be an issue.  However evolution over time has developed the senses we have and we do well with those.

11/2/2016 10:36 AM
RJ Yarwood wrote ...
A general reply. Does anybody else think that we would get used to having these senses and they wouldn't drive us mad? Like how we do not see our nose or better, how we cannot smell our own house because we see and smell these things constantly so we just drown them out
11/2/2016 9:30 AM
RJ Yarwood wrote ...
In response to Ryan C. This is true. I heard about a guy who could hear the electricity in the light bulbs and could match his pitch to that of the bulb. They thought he had perfect pitch but in reality he just learned what lights make what notes.
11/2/2016 9:25 AM
Kylie Coffelt wrote ...
Over time humans have evolved to meet the needs and adapted to the environment. Over time we have developed stronger senses, but also have lost the need for some body parts. Wisdom teeth, body hair, and the appendix are examples of body parts that we might have needed at an earlier time but we no longer have any use for them. Scientists have said that wisdom teeth could have been used for helping eat harder food substances, such as different kinds of nuts. Today we do not need to crack open nuts with our teeth, so the use for wisdom teeth is long gone. Another example is the appendix. The appendix serves no purpose in the digestive tract. Researchers have said that it might have been used long ago to help digest grass and other earthy substances. Now that we don’t eat grass, our bodies have evolved and we no longer need the appendix. The same evolution has occurred with our senses. We have grown into adapting to have all five main senses: smell, taste, touch, sight, and hearing. We do, however, not have as good smell and hearing ability as a dog or other creatures. Our senses are limited to only what we need to survive. If somehow we could access these super senses it would be almost as if we were super humans. Pros of these new super senses would be that we could track scents like dogs during a crime or to search bombs, we would no longer have the use of dogs in the workforce. Another pro is that we could see objects from very far distances coming towards us. We would no longer need binoculars or eye glasses. The final pro would be that we could hear conversations very well and would no longer need hearing aids. The main con of these super senses is that the people would no longer have any privacy. With the amazing hearing ability you could hear people taking in different rooms or even different sides of buildings. People could not have any secrets because everyone would be able to hear everything. Another con is that people could smell a horrible smell from miles away and it could be distracting. All in all, the biggest conflict with super senses is that people would have no privacy and it would be very hard to concentrate with all of the noises and smells and a person could be around.
11/2/2016 12:47 AM
Savanna Triplett wrote ...
I agree with Bariah, Genetically engineering humans to have the hearing of a bat would be an amazing sense to have, but it could have its down falls such as being distracted most of the time and hearing to many sounds at once.
11/1/2016 8:09 PM
Mya Wilson wrote ...
Humans would have the vision of a hawk. Sense of smell like a shark and hearing of bat. Over the years humans started to need better eye sight, smell, and hearing. Just as Charles darwin's theory of survival of the fittest human had to adapt to the changing environment. The pros of all of these are obviously better vision, smell and hearing. But also with better vision comes along with us being able at see things from a farther distance. A con could be you could see things you didn't want to see. Then there is the sense of smell. We would be able to truly smell things now more powerfully. Plus smell has a lot to do with taste so maybe we could have a better sense of taste. A con to this could be when something tasted or smelled bad it would really taste or smell bad. Lastly, there is the better hearing we would be able to hear things from father away. The con would be you would have very sensitive hearing.
11/1/2016 10:02 AM
Kaylyn Harrison wrote ...
Our 5 well-known senses have changed drastically over millenniums and are still changing today. We as a species as of right now, do not have to rely on super hearing or perfect eyesight to obtain what we need in life. We are more intelligent thinkers, we rely much more on intelligence now for the convince than for survival. Our population has grown and continues to grow. Inventions and products are made to make our everyday lives easier. What came along with these inventions though are not all good. These would include many types of pollution, sickness, and even climate change. If we evolved to have super senses, the world would change. For the better or worse, we don't know. We can only assume as with all changes, there are pros and cons.
11/1/2016 9:08 AM
Bailey Polinori wrote ...
The senses of all organisms are different. Even organisms within the same species differ from one another. The senses and thresholds of these senses differ based on the organism's environment and their ability to survive within it. For example, a shark is very sensitive to the scent of blood because they need to eat in order to survive and blood could possibly mean a meal for them. I think that ideally I would slightly increase the acuity of each of the five senses. Starting off with vision, a pro to having more keen eyesight is that a person would be able to sense danger from afar and possibly have better eyesight for a longer time than today's average human. A con to better eye sight is constantly being distracted by everything that they would now be able to see. Next is hearing. Being able to hear better would help a person to pay better attention and be able to catch things that an average human normally wouldn't. A con to this would be that they might hear something that they did not want to hear and possibly hurts the feelings of that person. Third is taste. If a person's sense of taste was increased it would benefit them in the sense that they would be able to better enjoy all of the flavors of a food that a regular human might not even taste. A con to this would be that some foods such as vegetables that they force themselves to eat, you may not like it even more when capable of tasting it more. Next is touch. If a person's sense of touch was increased this could possibly save them from getting injured such as when placing a hand on a hot stove, they would realize faster that it's hot and remove it before being severely burned. A con to this would be that they may be distracted by all of the different things that they could now feel due to the better sense of touch. Lastly is smell. Having a greater sense of smell could benefit a person if they were in an emergency situation and smelled the smoke in their house sooner than an average human and was able to get out of the house and call the fire department, without being injured. One of the downsides to this may be that it would alter the tastes of food and make some foods unappetizing.
10/31/2016 11:01 PM
Alexxis Heestand wrote ...
Humans slowly evolve to have better senses for many reasons, such as for vision, so we could be more careful in instances like driving. While hearing could involve to be better so we would not have to yell. Smell could evolve for the ability to be able to tell if something has gone bad but for things we can not notice now regularly. Then taste could evolve to be so we could know if something was poison and then not then drink or eat it and then die from it. While disadvantages for vision would be the fact we would see to much for our brains to comprehend. People hearing to many things to many things could distract us from the things we should actually be focusing on. Better sense of smell means you would then smell every gross smell better and that would be awful. Taste. Wing better could overwhelm you very easily and the same goes for your sense of touch.
10/31/2016 10:46 PM
kyliegh todd wrote ...
The sense of smell plays a decisive role in human societies, as it is linked to our taste for food, as well as our identification of pleasant and unpleasant substances. We have about 4 million smell cells in our noses, divided into about 400 different types. There is tremendous genetic variability within and between populations for our ability to detect odors. Each smell cell carries just one type of receptor or 'lock' on it. The smell floats through the air, fits into the 'lock' and then activates the cell. Thus creating a smell. Their are many pros and cons to having a "supersense". this is because it can open ours eyes to more things but it can also make us see this we thought were impossible. I would give my humans the "supersense" of sight. Meaning they could see all of the pollution in the world. How they are destroyed the atmosphere every time they throw their garbage out the window on the highway, and decide to let harmful vapors in the air. This would be an advantage because it would help people realize how badly we treat the earth. This will make them change their ways and hopefully decide to clean up. This would also be a disadvantage because they would constantly see the trash and bad vapors of the earth instead of seeing the beauty.
10/31/2016 10:15 PM
savanna triplett wrote ...
I speculate humans will evolve sensory abilities such as night vision and an increase of smell. One pro of night vision is you would be able to find animals in the dark better when you are hunting for food. This can come at a disadvantage because it can be distracting if a lot of creatures come out at dark. Another sensory ability could be an increase of smell. We can take advantage of this by locating any threats that could harm us near by and being able to smell a food source close. A disadvantage of an increased smell would be picking up every scent of odor that is near by.
10/31/2016 9:56 PM
Regan Crosser wrote ...
Over time, humans have managed to improve our senses if they appeared to be defective through advances in technology. We have ways to improves all of our senses and even have gone so far as to let them ineffectively rule us. We have grown so dependent and familiar to our customs that if you were to lose a sense,like being able to smell strawberries, you wouldn't even know it because the thought of what you think it should smell like is already programmed in your brain. Having superhuman qualities of sense wouldn't be much different than it is now, we would advance of course, but we would adjust and seeing a man in a purple shirt ten miles away would become the norm. The only downfall I see to this would be if we were to have superhuman senses, we would lose a sense of wonder and begin to try and develop them even further than they already would be. It would be an endless cycle of trying to perfect something that doesn't need to be perfected. We will always try and find a way to improve and diminish the ways of the past.
10/31/2016 9:53 PM
Skylee Bowlin wrote ...
Super senses would be amazing for activities like hunting, or shooting, you could spot the deer so easily! Although that does take some of the fun away from it. I believe that super senses would be a more of a disadvtange than advantage, because if you had super hearing, you would hear absolutley everything around you. It would drive you crazy. If someone already had a mental illness that already heard many voices, super hearing would simply just make them feel more uneasy. Everything would be more complicated than it already is. You could see things that you probably weren't meant to see, taste things in recipes that makes you hate your favorite food, and feel the slightest imperfection in an object. I believe that it would make our already distracted mind, even more unfocused.
10/31/2016 9:25 PM
Carrie Barnes wrote ...
Humans have constantly been adapting since the beginning of the species. Over time, we humans have found ways to help aid our senses, or even lack there of, with many things. If someone has trouble hearing, they would use a hearing aid. Hearing aids have gone from big, clunky objects that are held to the ear, to tiny pieces of technology to enhance hearing. Other aids to our senses include contacts and glasses. Many of these things help people adapt and aid their senses to be better than what they might already have. Now, if I was able to genetically engineer future generations of the human race, I would give us perfect vision. Some pros of this could be that people will no longer have to worry about the hassle of having contacts or glasses since they would no longer need them. People would no longer have to spend money on these objects, which can become quite costly. Some cons of perfect vision would be the loss of a huge market, contacts and glasses. This would decrease available jobs by a lot since people would no longer need to visit the eye doctor.
10/31/2016 9:24 PM
jade binius wrote ...
Being able to see further distances would be an advantage to humans because they'd have a wider field of vision and they would be able to see more around them. But if humans were to have a stronger sense of smell it would be a disadvantage due to the fact that if something were to smell really bad then they could smell that for miles away or however far there sense of smell carries out. If humans were to have super senses we would be different than what we are now because we could do things that certain animals can do and they have these skills to help them survive and if we had these super senses it might be more of a bother than an advantage because if you had a strong sense of smell then you'd smell something bad all day. and if you could hear better you might hear higher frequencies and things might be louder which wouldn't be the best if you were around loud machinery or equipment all day.
10/31/2016 8:28 PM
Anna Buratti wrote ...
Over time, us humans have adapted very well to our senses. Many different types of doctors can help with all of them. If you need help with your vision, there's a doctor for that. If you need help with hearing, there's a doctor and tools you can use to improve that. This list continues for all five of our main senses. I think our senses could improve over time a little bit, but not too much. If we had as strong a smell as a shark we would not be able to live our lives without constantly having an overwhelming smell of something. If we had the sight of a hawk we would get distracted on the little things around us and not be able to focus in on one thing. Our hearing would probably over-bear us if it was too strong as our ear drums can only take so much. Every sense is different to every species and i think ours is good the way it is.
10/31/2016 6:26 PM
Ryan Cuthbertson wrote ...
I agree with Ragan K. She mentioned that it would be uncomfortable to have the super sense of touch. Being able to touch every little thing on you. Even dust. I'm already uncomfortable with a lot of things touching me. I would hate to be itchy or constantly uncomfortable knowing that something is on my skin.
10/31/2016 4:17 PM
Ryan Cuthbertson wrote ...
The supersence of hearing any possible sound wave/frequency would be my choice. Over time I think if we studied who can pick up certain sound waves, how they do it, and then test people in order for them to adapt to the sound, I believe it could be possible to actually hear any sound. The advantages would be that your hearing would be outstanding. You would be able to hear underwater and hear things that only certain animals can. Some major disadvantages, would be, dog whistles, probably increased hearing in general (hear things outside our normal threshold) example would be a train that is miles away. We probably wouldn't be able to hear it normally. You might just hear it in the background. You would hear too much and not be able to focus on one certain sound.
10/31/2016 4:11 PM
Sarah Foster wrote ...
As humans we have our basic five senses of vision, hearing, smell, taste, and touch. We have evolved so we can fix problems with our senses by eye surgery to get better vision or putting in a hearing aid to pick up the noises we just can't seems to hear. Advantages if I could genetically change people is I could strengthen our hearing, so we don't have to deal with being deaf. I would strengthen seeing, nobody would have to be blind. The disadvantage would be with mental illnesses like schizophrenia sees even more than they already do. People who hear voices will hear them worse and it will make their lives worse. It would be great to alter people's senses if I could control the disadvantages.
10/31/2016 2:23 PM
Willow Daley wrote ...
I do not think that we should have super senses because they would just cause everything to be discombobulated. A pro would be that we could smell things that are dangerous to us and see things that are dangerous to us but a con would be that we would be able to smell and see things we don't want to see or smell more profoundly and that is the same with all of the other senses. If we loved the taste of something we could end up hating it because with super senses we would be able to taste more of it which could lead to a too bold taste changing the way we feel about it. I think the way animals senses are adapted are perfect for the way they live their lives.
10/31/2016 2:21 PM
Jordan Brown wrote ...
Humans have, over long lengths of time, adapted their natural abilities for what benefits them. While some humans are born naturally gifted, such as the limit a human has reached of 20/8, but to enhance one would require the brain to adapt to block out more than it perceives at any given time, as the sensory input would be vastly overwhelming. If you improved hearing by great margins then the sound of someone typing from across a room could become unbearable. If the scent of fresh manure makes you cringe now, then it could cause you to choke. If you could perceive individual hairs, how would you ever focus on a person's face? There are already drugs that exist that enhance the sense of touch, but the field it's used for is quite unsavory. Primarily torture. So given that any sense were to be increased to a "super-sense" it would be very necessary indeed to be able to block out the incoming receptors. With that said, I believe that the optimum sense to heighten would be taste. Imagine, if one were able to detect poison on their tongue. You would never get food poising because you would know what was bad and what was good. Of course this also might lead to picky eaters, or obesity. But it could also cause you to enjoy more foods. If each food had an individual flavor and one weren't to associate it with another, maybe there would be but a select few foods that we do not enjoy. Either way, senses improving would have vast pros and cons, but I think developing a sense of taste would be the most evolutionary advantageous for humans.
10/31/2016 12:22 PM
Tracy Wyatt wrote ...
Many of you bring up good points. There are great applications to having super senses and definite downsides!
10/31/2016 11:29 AM
Hunter Gillingham wrote ...
The five well known sense have evolved throughout the years, and differ from person to person. For example, if we had really good sense of smell you can smell the flowers from outside of your house but a con of this is that we could smell a garbage truck full of trash down the road. If you had a good sense of hearing, you can hear someone coming to your front door, but a con would be that loud noises can harm your eardrums. If you have really good taste, all the food that taste really good to you would be great but if there was something you did't like would not be to fun to eat.
10/31/2016 11:28 AM
River wrote ...
Humans, over time, have evolved to adapt their specific environments. Over time our sense of hearing adjusted to the loudness of our voices. Basically for basic communication (unless you're old or are talking to someone with a soft voice). We cannot hear things from afar because we do not need to. Think of a wolverine. They have excellent hearing and smell. They are better at those senses because they have to hunt for animals that are hard to see or find, like rabbits. So what I'm saying is that we have the hearing we do so that we can survive. The same concept goes for all our other senses. If we could have all of the best senses(like super hearing, smell, taste, vision, smell) I feel we would probably go insane. But I think having vision like a hawk would be really nice. If we did have super senses, we would be able to things we could never do(obviously) and accomplish things much easier, like our sight test and having no problem listening to people.
10/31/2016 11:08 AM
Deanna Pagnucco wrote ...
I would make the future humans have keen eye sight that is slightly stronger than what we have now, to insure that we can see what is coming at us from afar. Their sense of smell would be increased similar to a dogs, that way we would not have to use them to find drugs or other things. Sound would be heightened so we can hear a person in trouble from afar, that way we could save lives one sound at a time. Touch should increased so you could feel how long ago something was touched by another person, feeling the warmth of the object. Taste would be the same, because if heightened food probably would not be as good if somethings were too strong.
10/31/2016 7:46 AM
Kaitlyn Rinehart wrote ...
Human senses have evolved so that we take in alot more smells, we can identify more scents, we can fix eye sight when need be, if you need 20/20 vision and you have 20/80 vision, no problem. Easily fixed. Our hearing can be fixed with hearing aids and such if we need them. We can feel so many things like pain, but we can also fix our pain as well with medicines. We have scientists that create new flavors that we can taste. But what if all of these senses were evolved to being stronger than ever before? It'd help us in many ways, but could harm us just as easily. If you were to make our sight better than it is now, you could go hunting and spot that buck across the field and get a perfect shot without using a scope. We could smell rain coming before it even was cloudy outside. We could taste that little bit of extra something in a recipe and help to make it perfect. We could hear a quiet cry for help and potentially save a life just by hearing it. We could maybe even control what pain we feel without using medicine. But what about people with mental disorders? Or what about tragedies that happen? If someone is mentally insane and hears voices in their heads, imagine them also having to hear every single thing around them. You see it in movies sometimes how people hear so many things around them. It drives them crazy. Imagine being able to see a tiny spec of marker that the teacher didn't erase on the board. It would drive you crazy if you have OCD. What if you already think things are on you, crawling on you or underneath your skin, then being able to actually feel every little thing that touches you, even a particle of dust. More people than what there already is could be driven to kill them selves because of something like that. Imagine having to smell the rotting animal on the side of the country back road 20 miles away from your house. No thanks. Imagine tasting a spice that wasn't even used in a recipe, just because it previously touched a utensil that was used for the dish? It might taste disgusting. Human senses have evolved in many ways over many years. In the future, if humans were to have super-senses, there would be just as many cons as there would be pros.
10/31/2016 1:40 AM
Ragan Kirksey wrote ...
Over the course of human existence, humans have evolved within many aspects including their senses. The sense of hearing possibly could have evolved due to the need of protection from predators or to communicate with others. The sense of smell possibly could have evolved in order to spot danger, while sight could have evolved to increase skill and precision in hunting. The sense of touch could have been to increase population or once again, detect danger. There are both equally advantages and disadvantages to the abilities that our senses give us. Imagine increasing our senses, the adjustment to a dramatic change would have to be quick. There are disadvantages to gaining the increase, such as the extreme sensitivity to sound that one would have to endure day-to-day. Such an instance would be maddening and painful, especially in loud, social environments such as the school cafeteria during lunch. The heightened taste and smell could together result in disaster for pregnant women. There is the possibility of an increase in crime rate with the sense of balance, think of all the Catwoman impersonators! Now injuries can be even worse in pain levels, especially for those with a low tolerance to pain. Sight can increase danger and negative public opinion of strong figures. Imagine being able to spot dilated pupils and a drop of sweat on a person's face from miles away. There are then the advantages, such as hearing an intruder attempting a break-in minutes before even entering a home. A witness of a crime can recall certain smells to assist in the search of the suspect. Possibly, a drop in the use of illegal drugs due to the new sensations that taste can bring (especially during a major craving). The medical field can save so much money with the increase in touch, as a patient will have a much better ability to sense the origin of pain. This could also assist with blind readers, as it can possibly help them to learn the words and alphabet more quickly. Now, sight can aid in the performance of sports players. This just a small example of how the power to influence our senses can possibly affect us.
10/30/2016 11:51 PM
Brianna Biery wrote ...
Humans have evolved over the years with their sensory abilities. For example when people had to hunt for their own food they had a better sense of smell due to the fact that their life at the time depended on finding food to eat to live for another day. If I had the power to genetically engineer future generations of humans in such a way that their absolute thresholds are on a par with the best abilities found in nonhumans they would have the vision of a Tarsier which has extremely acute eyesight and night vision. The pros is that you wont have to wear glasses or need to take a flashlight with you in dark places but a con is that you would have poor color vision and your eyes would weigh more than your brain. Humans would have the hearing of a moth which can even outsmart a bat and hear the echolocation it uses to hunt its prey. The pros of this is that you can hear if someone/something is about to sneak up on you but a con is that you will hear every single thing surrounding you. For example you would be able to hear people chewing up their food...GROSS!! Humans sense of smell would be transformed into that of a black bears. They can smell a food source from 18 miles away.I don't really see there really having pros but the cons would be that you couldn't block any smell whatsoever so even though you could smell the wonderful flowers you would also have a strong smell of a students throw-up after eating the school lunch. They would also have the sense of taste like a catfish. Catfish have over 10,000 taste buds! The pros of this is that you would be really be able to savor the flavor of your Thanksgiving dinner but that also means that you will be able detect and hate everything a lot more than you already did about your mothers stew (YUCK!) Jewel Beetles would be humans new and improved sense of touch. The pros of this is that we will be able sense when a fire is occurring. The con of this is that we will be able to tell when a fire is occurring from 50 miles away and who needs to know that!? Meaning that will become a nuisance in some instances and will make you become paranoid.
10/30/2016 11:13 PM
Allison Slutz wrote ...
Humans evolved their present sensory abilities based on the basic needs of our species. Our senses help us understand the world around us and keep us safe. Every animal has evolved in order to fulfill specific needs for survival in their environment. This is how each animal including humans has different heighten senses. In humans our senses serve to navigate the world around us. The sense of touch let us feel pain so we do not seriously burn ourselves on a stove. Our eyesight has evolved allowing us to recognize the world around us. Taste warns us from eating something dangerous. Smell is closely related to taste and helps to warn us. Hearing gives us a way to communicate and hear danger. If humans genetically engineered future generations in such a way that their absolute thresholds are on a par with the best abilities found in non-humans changing us into super-humans. There would be pro and cons to this evolution for each of the senses. Our heighten eyesight would be like butterflies. Butterflies can see the ultraviolet part of the spectrum. This would cause humans to see different things illuminated, for example, power lines would be glowing. The pro would would be a wider range of what can be seen by humans. The con would be seeing the glow of the ultraviolet light. Our taste buds like the catfish. Normally they have around 100,000 taste buds compared to our 10,000. As a result of having so many taste buds, we could taste when dinner is close and the location it is in. Pro would be finding food quickly and efficiently. Con would be when you taste something really bad, you can really taste it. For example, I do not like onions. Not being able to get this taste out of my mouth would be torture. Also, hearing would be similar to a greater wax moth. These moths can hear at 300kHz. Humans are around 20kHz. The future human race could use this super hearing ability to change the way we communicate. A pro would be we could speak at a different frequency causing different species to not be able to hear what we are saying. A con would be not getting enough sleep due to being able to hear every little thing. I see the potential of this leading to insomnia. Humans sense of smell would be like cows. Future mankind could smell odors from 5 to 6 miles away. A pro would be the ability to find food. A con would be smelling bad smells like a skunk and having to be several miles away to not smell this. Our super humans would be able to touch like manatees. Humans would have tactile hairs. This would allow them to feel objects from a distance. A pro would be being able to feel the slightest breeze. Also, you could navigate through the dark without the fear of running into objects. A con would be being able to feel pain much more intensely.
10/30/2016 10:42 PM
Reilly Cameron wrote ...
For a human being to have the hearing of a dog would have many different advantages and disadvantages. Some pros to this are being able to hear great distances, hearing pitches humans are unable to, and the government could use this ability to its advantage. Some cons would be hearing things you did not want to, having super sensitive hearing, and people taking advantage of you for having this ability.
10/30/2016 9:27 PM
Zeina Katabi wrote ...
It is known that as time progresses, organisms evolve to adapt to their environment. For example, Africans have dark skin to protect them from the intense sun while Europeans have lighter skin because their usual weather is rainy and gloomy; not a lot of sun exposure. As we explore senses, however, humans worldwide have similar sense abilities no matter the environment. As technology has improved, we have been able to reverse effects of our senses, and in some cases even improving them beyond the original state. Hearing aids have been created to help the hard of hearing hear, and in some cases, their hearing is increased more than the average human. Other advances we have made fall in the eyesight region. Surgeries, glasses, contacts, and even eye injections have been created in order to help humans improve their eyesight. With that being said, we still do not have extreme senses by no means; the reason being, we don’t need them. We can smell a cake baking or we can see a few miles into the distance, and although that is nowhere near the sense of a hawk or a shark, that is all we need. If humans were to have super senses there would be disadvantages as well as advantages. The first con would be that the idea of privacy would be nonexistent, if one has increased hearing senses. We also would not be able to concentrate with all of the other noise so clear in our ears. Any task involving any sense of concentration would be significantly harder to do, if other sounds were bombarding our ears. Another con would be if there was an unpleasant scent, it would be heightened. As for me, I would most likely get queasy. Over time, humans would adapt as a species and we would eventually use our super senses to our advantage. A sense that could potentially help us if it was heightened would be our ability to see. For driving if we could see far into the distance, we could prepare for obstacles in our path. Another advantage that would be incredibly useful to humans would be night vision like bats. It would be useful for driving at night or even getting up to go to the bathroom in the middle of the night. Our depth perception might even increase as well. As for the other senses, I do not think there would be any advantages. An overall disadvantage would be that many more crimes could happen since we would be super humans. In conclusion, I think that our senses how they are, are adequate, and super senses have more cons than pros.
10/30/2016 9:05 PM
Amber Mondak wrote ...
If I had the ability to genetically engineer future generations so that our senses were at absolute threshold of supersensed animals, this would create some disadvantages. Humans evolved to their present sensory abilities by new developed medicine and technology. People who lose ability in their hearing can put in hearing aids to improve their hearing. People with weak eyesight can can wear glasses or contacts. This has helped improve many people's lives in what they can do. A pro with having a supersense is that there is almost no limit to what they can do. They wouldn't have to walk up to the front of the class to see the board, ask someone to repeat what they said, they would notice ingredients in edible substances. People wouldn't have to spend money on items like glasses and hearing aids because they wouldn't need them. Disadvantages to having supersenses includes; not being able to be fully engaged in one conversation in the midst of a noisy crowd, being able to smell all the gross scents along with the good, tasting things that you must consume but have a negative taste, and feeling painful things more painfully such as needles. There are pros and cons to supersenses, but I think that we should stick with the in between.
10/30/2016 9:02 PM
Bariah Wade wrote ...
If I could genetically engineer the future generations of humans by advancing their elementary senses, I would give them the hearing of a bat. A bat can hear up to a range of up to 200 kHz. The advantages of humans having superior hearing is that well, they would have amazing hearing that could help them in cases of danger. Also, exceptional hearing could be an advantage because you could hear what everyone is saying and you could hear things from very far distances. Disadvantages of having superior hearing would be that you would hear everything. all.the.time . Which, in turn could be very infuriating. Another impeccable sense that I would give the future generations would be the sight of the mantis shrimp. This animal's sight is very unique because unlike humans, ( who only have 3 different photo receptors in their eyes) the mantis shrimp have 16 different photo receptors. Studies have shown that four to seven photo receptors are enough to see every color under the sun so imagine how many colors that the mantis shrimps' eyes unlock! I think this would be an advantage because the human eye could see the world in so much, much more color than we already see. It would be like a completely different world than how we see it now. It could possibly be a disadvantage because too much color could overwhelm the senses. The last "supersense" that I would gift the future generations would be the taste ability of a catfish. A catfish is covered in 175,000 taste sensitive cells. They can literally taste all of the directions that water flows and can detect the presence of prey by taste. I'd say this would be an advantage because amazing taste would be awesome and you could taste your favorite foods 10x better. However, that could also be a disadvantage because that also means that the taste of your not so favorited foods would be heightened.
10/30/2016 8:48 PM
Steven Littell wrote ...
I think that it would be quite interesting to see if humans had the sense of smell that a hammerhead shark has. Hammerhead sharks can "smell" electricity. What if humans could do the same? I think it may make life more difficult since we are always around electricity and that would block out our current sense of smell and would be extremely annoying. But it may also pose as an advantage since we may be able to know weather or not a device has power before we try to turn it on.
10/30/2016 7:03 PM
Ruchi Patel wrote ...
Humans have evolved a lot throughout history to adapt to our changing environment. We have the certain senses that we have because they are the senses that we need in order to survive in our world. One way humans have evolved within our senses is sense of taste. Over the past centuries, our tastes have changed because of accessibility of different foods from all around the world. Advantage of having "super senses" would be that we would be even more great human beings than we are right now. We would be able to hear important things that we aren't able to hear. As well as ability to see like a hawk or sensing one drop of blood in a million drops of water like shark. I do think this could have some negative effects if supersenses were enhanced. Everyone would become more robotic instead of being who they actually are.
10/30/2016 1:18 PM
Tiffany O'Brien wrote ...
I think it would be cool to have the eye sight of a bunny. Bunnies can see nearly 360 degrees, they have a tiny blind spot in front where their nose is. The advantage would be that you could see everywhere and know what is going on behind you but then again the disadvantage would be that I think it would get annoying. Plus it would be harder to concentrate on certain tasks.
10/30/2016 11:42 AM
Mikayla Barker wrote ...
Supersenses would only seem to be beneficial in times of need. They do have their pros like being able to smell for something you've lost or see items from afar in depth. But, they have cons like not being able to turn these senses off. You may smell or hear something you wouldn't want to.
10/28/2016 12:01 PM
Alecia Vlaiku wrote ...
The absolute thresholds of our senses vary from person to person. Imagine if we had super sense where we are able to smell or see something from miles away or have the ability to sense things that we would never have sensed before without having supe senses. Advantages of obtaining supersenses would be that we are able to hear from a great distance and we would have great eye sight so we would be able to see things quicker than normal which may result in less accidents and more awareness of what's around us. Some disadvantages would be our sense of smell because we would be able to smell from long distances which would not be a good thing if we were able to smell a dead animal or a field being fertilized from miles away. As humans having supersenses we would have to adapt ourselves to our environment and our sense abilities.
10/28/2016 10:36 AM
Ryan Stainer wrote ...
Humans would have evolved our present sensory abilities by gene splicing or putting people into long lasting situation going on for generations to develop super senses.The advantages would be better sight and hearing to locate things with, smell to track people or objects. The disadvantages would be light sensitivity and loud noises would harm you as well as very pungent smells.
10/27/2016 12:52 PM
RJ Yarwood wrote ...
Super-senses would be sweet. The reason humans probably do not have them is not only because we haven't need acute senses in so long that we have lost much of that ability but also because we probably evolved with the minimum to survive in the first place and relied on our superior intelligence to survive. The biggest problems with great senses would be that it would be harder to have private conversations and by the time we would have the ability to do this we would be almost out of landfill space and that is when we would want to have a weaker sense of smell. On the positive side, it would help law enforcement because they would no longer need to use dogs as humans sense of smell would be on par or better.
10/27/2016 8:05 AM
Faith Leech wrote ...
I think having the supersenses would be very bad for humans. I believe that it would cause a lot of problems. Some people get headaches from strong smells and imagine how it would be if we have the supersense to smell anything very strongly. I think we would eventually go insane because being able to have the ability to see very well would probably drive some people nuts.
10/27/2016 8:04 AM
Draven Stanley wrote ...
I think that humans with extremely good hearing would be more sensitive to loud noises and irritating sounds, and more easily get hearing loss from working in or near places with machinery or woodshops. Improved sight would only be advantageous, because there is no danger to good eyesight. People with an improved visual acuity would probably be able to play sports that require accuracy much better because their hand-eye coordination would probably be much better than a normal person. Smell would probably have no important advantages or disadvantages in modern society, besides being able to tell more easily where a smell is coming from. Bad odors would also be more overpowering for people with a better sense of smell. I think that taste and touch both are useless for modern society to have an improved sense of, besides being better taste-testers.
10/27/2016 7:53 AM
Seth Shivers wrote ...
I believe that our senses evolved or over time due to the environment humans were in, and what they needed to do to survive. Humans developed adequate sight to be able to see animals they were hunting, and also developed a decent sense of smell to be able to have an idea of the environment around them. In the future I believe if anything, the senses of humans may evolve to regress, as now we live in a world assisted by so much technology, we may not always use our senses to the extent we once did. However, I do believe if in the future humans were genetically engineered to possess superhuman traits and senses, I believe there would be a fair amount of advantages and disadvantages. Some advantages would that soldiers with these traits would be much more efficient and safe, due to them being able to hear, see, and even smell or feel out trouble before an average human could. These senses would also take professional sports to another level, as athletes would be even in more precise in their respective games, especially football or basketball where hearing, and sight can be very important. Some big disadvantages would be that these senses could be very overwhelming to some when paired with a human's brain and intelligence. If a human could see every little detail in a large room, and hear the softest voices having conversations in the cafeteria, could be extremely stressful to a human brain, taking that all in at once. I believe for these enhanced sense to be viable, the human brain would need to be greatly evolved as well.
10/27/2016 7:51 AM
Angela Young wrote ...
Humans have adapted their senses as the environments around them have changed. For example, Our sense of hearing could have been greater when we needed to hunt to survive. If needed our senses could evolve even more over time. If we had a more acute sense of smell we may be able to smell the cookies our neighbors down the street are making, but we would also have to smell that skunk someone hit a few blocks away. If we could see through things, it would be very cool, but it would completely throw our privacy out the window. Hearing would be great because our parents could hear us when we yell from upstairs, but we may hear things other people are saying about us that could probably hurt us. If our sense of taste was greater, it would be great for when we are eating a food we really like, but it would be torture when we are forced to eat something we cant stand.More acute senses could be great in many ways, but it could also be unpleasant in certain situations,
10/26/2016 6:09 PM
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